biodesign

  • 11.11.2011. - 18.12.2011.

    Plexus

    Maddalena Mauri, Kata Mijatović, Nika Radić, Davor Sanvincenti

    In one of his numerous diary notes, James Boswell, English lawyer and writer, wrote that he fears his soul will lose its recognizable shape in the crisis he has found himself in. In other words, he feared he would psychically lose his shape. Today, thanks to philology, psychology, as well as psychoanalysis, it is known that Boswell suffered from hypochondria and that his fear from losing his shape is just a metaphor for what we prefer to call losing control over one’s life. Brian Dillon points that the root of Boswell’s problems lies solely n the belief that there exists a perfect unity of body and mind, that the body is actually a machine, like a hardware being controlled by the mind, i.e. software. When Boswell wrote his diary, the term subconsciousness is unknown in Western culture, so we can only guess whether the anxiety Boswell felt would have been easier if he knew – like we today know, thanks to the psychoanalytical theory – that there are areas of human life that are impossible to control(...)

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  • 25.02.2011. - 03.04.2011.

    Mirabilia

    Yoko Fukushima, Silvio Vujičić, Tatjana Vukelić

    Mirabilia is the name of this year’s first exhibition dedicated to the relationship between design and art. At the beginning of the modern era, this Latin word denoted phenomena that were difficult to attribute to one of the two general categories: to the natural, God-made world or to the world created by human activity.We believe that in this exhibition the works of Silvio Vujičić, Yoko Fukushima and Tatjana Vukelić have the same kind of hybrid status. In their works, the dilemma is only transferred from the ontological categories of animate and inanimate, Godly and human, to the area of design, which, on the other hand, moved from the traditional position of designing clothes to designing humans. However, in the contemporary world of biopolitics, the works of these artists should not be viewed as moral warnings. Their bio-design only marginally touches upon the ethical aspect of human culture. Although the first reaction to these works may best be represented with the question: Where is the limit to exploiting and cultivating nature?, the general impression of the exhibition is closer to fantasy than to ecology. In other words, there is more than serious social questions in this exhibition; some transparent intimacy, awkward irony, bizarre beauty and irresponsible play(K.Š.)...

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