psychology

  • 02.03.2018. - 07.04.2018.

    Marija Ančić. Morbid Frames

    Marija Ančić is a former finalist of the Radoslav Putar Award and an artist whose work takes place at the intersection of traditional art disciplines (drawing, animation) and culture of social networks (GIF, blog, etc.). Ančić graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts in Split at the departments of restoration in 2005 and sculpture in 2010. She lives and works in Zagreb as an independent artist.

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    When the subject of selfhood is broached from the inevitably uncanny perspective, incessantly engulfing the subject and thus becoming its constitutive part, as Marija Ančić does it, the medium of GIF presents itself as an ideal solution. Figurative animation which implies the stylization of the real world, presupposes a subjectively “skewed” gaze. In addition, the minimal form of narration tying together the story’s beginning and end into an integral whole, thereby renouncing causality, is contingent upon the uncanny content: the inability to distinguish dream from reality, the state of security from the state of danger, and self from the other.

    Ančić’s poetics can be easily classified under the gothic genre which, among other things, possesses a trans-historic quality (it first referred to the Middle Ages, and then to the Victorian era), so it should not come as a surprise that it also found its place in the Digital era. Moreover, not only does the contemporary gothic draw on the themes and motifs that originated primarily from Victorian and Edwardian literature (during the genre’s inception), but it also democratically spreads onto all the other art forms (visual and fine arts, theatre, film, music, comics…) in which it promptly creates new forms (as is the case in postmodernism), namely in the horror genre. 

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  • 11.11.2011. - 18.12.2011.

    Plexus

    Maddalena Mauri, Kata Mijatović, Nika Radić, Davor Sanvincenti

    In one of his numerous diary notes, James Boswell, English lawyer and writer, wrote that he fears his soul will lose its recognizable shape in the crisis he has found himself in. In other words, he feared he would psychically lose his shape. Today, thanks to philology, psychology, as well as psychoanalysis, it is known that Boswell suffered from hypochondria and that his fear from losing his shape is just a metaphor for what we prefer to call losing control over one’s life. Brian Dillon points that the root of Boswell’s problems lies solely n the belief that there exists a perfect unity of body and mind, that the body is actually a machine, like a hardware being controlled by the mind, i.e. software. When Boswell wrote his diary, the term subconsciousness is unknown in Western culture, so we can only guess whether the anxiety Boswell felt would have been easier if he knew – like we today know, thanks to the psychoanalytical theory – that there are areas of human life that are impossible to control(...)

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