digital

  • 26.04.2019. - 18.05.2019.

    Paper, Scissors, Book

    Bruketa & Žinić & Grey, Dejan Dragosavac Ruta, Danijel Dragojević, Irena Frantal, Peter Greenaway, Siniša Labrović, Dubravka Vidović, various artefacts 

    Curators: Petra Galović, Klaudio Štefančić

    The international newspapers has recently paid much attention to the sales of traditional and electronic books. Namely, the statistics have shown that the drop in sales of paper books has not only ceased but even surpassed the sales of e-books manifold in certain – mainly Anglo-Saxon – markets. In a way, this information is both surprising and decisively not so. It is surprising because at one point it did seem that e-books met the key criteria of democratic education. They were cheap, or at least cheaper from paper ones; they were, thanks to the Internet, widely accessible; they were economical because they did not take up much space or collect dust; they possessed the yet untapped potential of networking texts as well as readers’ experiences, etc. Of course, all that potential would not have been possible without the devices, the new generation of e-readers, such as Kindle or iPad. The new e-readers have gotten better in the field of screen technology and wireless connectivity with sales centres (bookstores) and less so in the area of interpersonal communication and empowering the readers in general. Paradoxically, the greatest efforts have been put into making e-reading as similar to paper books, whether by imitating the colour of paper on screen or by designing new fonts, or – most often – both. One of the key devices in that technological evolution (Kindle 2) would thus be advertised based on its particular achievement: by adjusting the paper colour and font on the new screen, we recreated the nineteenth-century readers' experience, they boasted in Amazon.

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